Last week something horrible happened in Toronto. A van was driven along a busy sidewalk ending ten lives and injuring another 15 people. 

While the event is horrific, I want to focus on some of the beautiful stories which have emerged. 

The arresting police officer who did NOT shoot the suspect. This despite the guy’s aggressive moves inviting death by cop.

People handed out water to people who found themselves walking home due to at least a partial shutdown of the subway.

The Mom who was picnicking with her baby, shifted into action to provide first aid for the injured and dying. What’s more she apparently actively recruited other bystanders to help the injured.

There was no major security lockdown of the city, which I can only imagine would have escalated the anxiety around what was happening.

None of our government agencies rushed uninformed to social media to blame this on terrorism or any other group. 

In other words, Toronto and this beautiful country did what we do best. We chose not to overreact to a horrible situation. We chose to stand with each other. We chose to remain calm as we figured out the truth.

Thought of the week

fWhen something happens in the world around you it is natural to feel anxious. It might be a horrific event such as this event. It could also be a small problem at work. 

Anxiety is a normal part of being human. Our ancestors needed anxiety to heighten their senses and prepare for fight or flight. The anxiety, though, is not the actual problem. It’s only an indicator of a problem.

When you are feeling anxious you can either do something to feel better about the anxiety, or you can address the source of the anxiety.

Problem solving starts with learning to be with the feeling of anxiety. It’s not a lot of fun, but it is the gateway to real problem solving. 

The next time you feel anxious about something, acknowledge the anxiety you’re feeling and look for what’s causing it.

In other words, keep calm and carry on.